Jump to content

Mum

Members
  • Posts

    725
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Mum

  1. Perhaps the blood belonged to the rat? Maybe he got a bit pecked?
  2. Where has CC written that? Is that your MOd head speaking, Christian? I may have it wrong, but I interpreted Mum's comment as a sympathy joke: shocked at CC's experience and was suggesting that the person who was the Locum was so bad they must surely have been an imposter. Thank you, WitchHazel, that was precisely how the comment was meant. I've edited nonetheless; methinks I have gained a a reputation in certain circles which is actually quite contrary to the type of person I actually am. Perhaps my writing style needs rethinking? Ho hum: at least one person understood the sentiment and didn't take it the wrong way.
  3. Where has CC written that? She didn't - it was me having a pathetic attempt at humour? - because that is what the person sounded like based on the description she gave. Purely rhetorical. Apologies! Clearly it was a mistaken attempt at humour and I shall edit it to extract it.
  4. Wow! I do hope he recommends you to his friends so you can start up as a business and earn some extra cash!! That is one happy doggie!!
  5. Crikey, Cheeky Chooky! ... Even my 16yo would have recommended at least one paracetamol for the headaches rather than a bowl of water!!! (And would know better than to answer his mobile during a conversation ). Edited to remove attempt at "humour".
  6. Oh wow! I'm not a fan of nekid necks - but I have to admit, the chicks are very endearing
  7. £15 is a reasonable price, other garden specialists begin at £18.99 for a bare rooted specimen. Don't know quite how easily the trees could be espaliered, or if it needs to be a particular strain? Tesco have some bare rooted trees, not quite as good value as Aldi/Lidl, but definately cheaper than your local garden centre (and they are the very same bare rooted trees - including labels - as the Aldi/Lidl ones. You may still be able to get a half decent bargain there? (Even though I am anti-Tesco )
  8. There's no cure you know; you definately have chicken pox!
  9. ((get well soon)) This does not surprise me in the least. Funnily enough, in a lecture last week, the lecturer was saying how student Dr's only receive one lecture on talking to patients Now, considering how much of their time is spent on "customer" interaction, that is astonishing (which is why he brought it up!). In my professional opinion, do take the anti-biotics; do not drink alcohol, do not pass go and do not collect £200. Yours sincerely Mum CEO of Family Inc.
  10. Wishing you and your family good wishes
  11. Well that's confused me because it was my understanding that "Chummy" was real and not fictitious But the hunt continues to find her:
  12. And what a lovely space you do have for them Lewis! I am delighted to report that this morning, I discovered 2 eggs in the duck house Only looked on the offchance (and to see how much mess there might be) and I was delighted to find them! Each weighs 50g, which is about the size of egg my cream legbar produces. Perhaps they will get larger as the girls age, like chicken eggs? Not that I'm concerned about weight, just over the moon to have results so quickly!!
  13. It does depend on the particular character, but I do have to say Pekins - in my experience - have been the noisiest. But, it isn't simply that they make a noise, it is the type of noise they make. A bwark bwark, or a chook-chook-chook actually isn't an unpleasant sound as far as daily chit chat goes, but, Pekins have a way of shrieking-style which hits right in the nail on a blackboard boundary (for me, at least).
  14. I think your approach is working very well Now that you have had them 10 days, I would use the opportunity when they first settle at night to remove them, one at a time, to give them a weekly inspection/health check (legs, under wings, vent). That serves two purposes: first, and foremost, if they should get mites/lice, by checking them weekly you will spot it sooner rather than later; second, the bonus, they get used to being handled so if the time should come and you do need to handle them to treat them, they will be used to it. Not all hens like to be touch/handled/stroked so don't be too disappointed if they don't let you do it when they are FR. But, the weekly inspections are a way forward.
  15. What a fantastic video, thank you for sharing it Orville is absolutely adorable!!! It was good to see your chooks and ducks about together. Territorial drakes I'll have to see how that works out, may be a good thing because I get wild mallards visiting my garden/pond throughout Spring, so perhaps him being territorial won't be a big problem? Roosting bars were removed before they arrived and dh is going to build a pen/run so they more space for foraging, but still attached to the classic and run so they will be safe at night when we're not around.
  16. Thank you. I did not know that. In that event, I have a "spare" pen for "breathing space"
  17. Not quite sure what to call it but I had an "urge", a very strong one at that; it's been niggling away at me for some time now. I have 16 hens and I adore them, yet I'm maxed out on chooks now; but morehens struck in a very lateral way ... so, today I added to my flock ... ... a trio of Khaki Campbells I've been researching and reading and Omletting advice and today I became so itchy with it all, that I went to my chook supplier and came home with 3 of the most gorgeous (if skittish!) ducks: Sir Francis, Elizabeth and Queenie. I'm hoping, in time, they will free range with my chooks and it will be happy families all round. Yes, this would probably be better placed in the "Duck" forum ... ... or, would it? After all, it was "morehens disease" which ultimately led me down Duck Lane! So, question: will chooks and ducks integrate (merely for FRing, not accomodation)? The research I have done suggests they willl be ok, but, now I actually have them, I would like to know if the rhetoric meets reality? The trio are housed in a classic eglu, with standard run + a "duck pond" of an underbed storage box, plus grub and glug. When FRing, they will no doubt utilise my fish pond and all of my feathered friends spend time in the "copse" end of my garden (fruit trees, veg beds, shrubs, shade/sun and "moat" area - which we plan on lining and having an actual moat-of-sorts). Am I doing enough? Do these plans seem reasonable? Funny how, when researching, it all sounds so simple, but once you have taken the plunge, insecurities surface
  18. Best of British at the vets ((hugs))
  19. Great tip, OSH!!! Thank you
  20. Only gained access about an hour ago .. "gateway error" since 4am this morning! Hoping all is well with the powers that be, that is was a glitch and not an issue Glad it is back up and running
  21. I lived on the Isle of Dogs 1979 - mid 1980's; you are quite right, no central heating - but that was not unusual at that time; indoor bathroom was a point of fact - but very utilitarian as opposed to aesthetic!!! Around that very same time, locally, people were considering moving to the newly developed "Milton Keynes"! Many did! It is my belief that the style of housing I inhabited at that time is still in use today. How far it has been brought into the 21st Centuary is an entirely different debate and one I cannot possibly comment on Simply one I relate to of that era.
  22. Beautiful girls you have!!! I would try the soak route (plus blow-dry ) for the muddy clumps before resorting to cut them off. Why? a) it gives you a sense of satifaction - mud is soluable ) b) if you have not "cut" before, soaking is a safer option - I speak from experience of cutting one hens "nails" and causing a bleed I felt awful about! c) It gives you hands-on-cuddle-time! Pricelss in terms of them understanding who you are and also their place in the flock d) I cannot see their feet so my opinion is based on my experience rather than your reality.
  23. For ex-batts, that is extremely good!!! Well done, you!!!

×
×
  • Create New...