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kopperdrake

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About kopperdrake

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    Chicken Eggspert
  • Birthday March 16
  1. Could be vixen teaching cubs to hunt. They're typically born late March, start hunting with their parents in July and will hunt in pairs, typically, in August. This site is interesting: http://www.nfws.org.uk/fox-calendar-of-events.html But we also know from experience that the run on our Mk1 Cube has saved the lives of our hens twice that we know of.
  2. Hi all, I own a few Omlet products (old Cubes, Gos, Go Ups) but none of the new Cubes. I've come up with something that fits all of our runs, but was wondering if the mesh size (gaps of the actual holes) are still the same with the new Cube runs? Would anyone be able to help me out? Cheers Duncan
  3. I think it's plain and simple - as a chicken lover, how would I feel if I knew my birds contracted it and I hadn't carried out the recommended advice beforehand? And then I'd helped it spread to local people's flocks, many of whom I would know as friends. I think a little tough love now will hopefully prevent a lot of nastiness - just think back to the foot and mouth contagion and the sight of those poor cows - I'll never forget those days
  4. Ooh, you're close to us - how big a bag does the Miscanthis come in, and where from?
  5. We backed away slowly, closed the kitchen door, and waited for her to decide when she'd quite like to fly back out of the open window she'd flown in by. Some things are best left to nature
  6. Bliss bedding - the eucalyptus variety if we can get it!
  7. We've had a mink attack at the farm next door - I think they're the worst; smaller than a fox so can slink through the tiniest of gaps. We've had a fox attack last spring, electric fencing has done the trick there. And we lost a bantam a few years ago, we suspect she'd been taken from above as we found no feathers, and we suspect the local sparrowhawk. She's that prolific around here our neighbour's even had her sitting in his kitchen sink after she overshot her prey and flew through his open window! Picture that, Pete and I stood in his kitchen, not eight feet from this dazed Sparrowhawk, giving us the beadies, trying to figure how on earth you get a set of talons like that our of your house!
  8. This is a tough one, but we're pretty strict when it comes to this sort of thing. My son is 13 and I won't let him watch 15 films or play games over his age rating, unless I really do know the film/game. It doesn't help that he's immature for his age too, so he does struggle to comprehend some things above his age anyway. I know he probably watches/plays stuff at friends' houses that he knows we wouldn't let him watch or play at home, but to me it's the rules that are important in certain situations. For example, every teen knows how to swear, but they need to know that swearing in certain company is not acceptable - we call it 'onion skinning'. You can peel a layer or two off yourself when in certain company, and let your guard down, but it's best to know the boundaries that dictate when you should leave all the layers intact - like strangers, older generation, grandparents etc. The fact my son knows we disprove of him playing or watching older stuff hopefully means he knows that there is a line there and that he has crossed over it, and as parents we're not pleased with it. It's the hardest part of parenting I think, to be a parent first, and a friend second, but I've seen too many children bend their parents around their little fingers, and I never really see it as doing any good for either - often it causes resentment and lack of respect. Besides, a bit of waiting never did anyone any harm
  9. I hate the heat - my melting point's about 24 Celsius I've a choice of either working outside, sweat dripping from *everywhere*, or sitting inside behind a PC screen, spending my time sweating from everywhere *whilst* squishing thunderbugs on the screen before they find their way behind the glass and spend the rest of existence as a small but rather annoying blurry black blob on my monitor Oh how I long for proper seasons again!
  10. We're finally getting crops too - a lovely Italian spikey cucumber is a regular now, the raspberries and gooseberries are in full flow, and the new potatoes are ready too, after a late start. Globe artichokes are also continuing, and raised bed lettuce hasn't totally been eaten by slugs And we too also managed to get to a small cherry tree before the blackbird, though I suspect he was concentrating on the black currant bushes Squash and sweetcorn are still way behind where they are normally though.
  11. We home grow ours too - wash it, spin it in our ageing salad spinner to dry it, place it in a ziplock bag (the freezer ready kind), with as much air out as possible before sealing, then into the *bottom* of the fridge where it's coldest. Works perfectly and even crisps up the limp leaves picked at the wrong time of day
  12. Where are you based? If you're anywhere near the East Midlands, we use Minster Vets - they have a very specialised poultry service which would tell you what you have, but they do charge. However, I don't remember them being worse charges than a standard vet, and they seriously know their stuff. They have poultry specialists in York, Hereford, Sutton Bonington, Leominster, Carlisle, Lancashire and Wrexham. http://www.minstervets.co.uk/contact
  13. Our first ex-batts were named after the witches in Terry Pratchett novels - we had Granny Weatherwax (Granny), Agnes Nitt (Aggie), Gytha Ogg (Oggy) and Magrat Garlick (Maggie). We made the mistake of letting the children name a flock of random rescues, and ended up with Spotty, Snowy, Blackie, Ginger, Lonely, Bluebelle (the bluebelle) and Quickie. It wouldn't have been so bad if there had been any sense of irony with the names, but there wasn't. Lately our cocks are named after kings, so we've had Charles, William and Ethelred the Unready (Cooked) but now we're on Colin, which kind of spoils things a bit as we didn't name him. The girls are named after plants and flowers - Daisy, Holly, Mistletoe (two winter birds), and also the old fashioned names, Maud, Emma, Betty, Florence, and we have one called Jackie after my mother-in-law, as she's Colin's favourite, and that happened to be my father-in-law's name.
  14. Just a thought, but with new chicks we place a light inside the coop and they tend to gravitate towards the light as the night draws in. Could you maybe try that?

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