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Beantree

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Beantree last won the day on October 18

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Chicken Addict (8/19)

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  1. We're running our flocks down now, so not replacing losses and not breeding anymore. Ultimately we'll just have egg layers considered 'disposable', which is very sad because we've loved keeping chickens as pets. The rules here are birds are destroyed within a radius of infection and no exceptions and it seems AI is here to stay.
  2. As you say @Pants, it's not a case of breeding but cross breeding to get what you want. So they don't breed true, with a cock ands hens producing more cocks and hens with the same attributes. Whoever is producing these has two or more different breed pens and crosses them in large quantities to get the hens on the market at the right price as you describe. Perhaps a life mission? Perhaps just buy some Cream Legbars?
  3. We were hit with customs duty as well @Ursula123 and have stopped buying from the UK. The item was £35 plus £30 door to door delivery quoted by UPS European, plus VAT (still cheaper than here). After arrival we were, a few weeks later, hit with a €35 invoice for extra delivery and customs duty, which then made the item more expensive! We expected UPS to know what they were doing, but it seems after we queried it the customs charges vary unpredictably, depending on who at the border is checking the items? I've heard the same applies the other way and some people in England have stopped buying from Europe.
  4. Usually the bottom of the pecking order is running about avoiding the others. What you describe is typical of illness, like a heavy worm burden, sour crop or egg bound? What are her poos like? Has she any abdominal swelling? Have you checked her throat for cankers?
  5. We have had the same problem @rachel84 and the main problem is that slug slime taints the food and the chickens stop eating. Our slugs are not like those in the UK. They are Orange and can reach 4" long. There is also a grey variety which can get bigger, but it's less of a problem because it usually feeds on small slugs. All we did was put the feeders in at night and fetch them out in the morning. Any slugs found in the area are put in a bag in the bin or squashed. Eventually (over a few months) the numbers drop dramatically, but they never stop coming.
  6. You have to train them in stages over about two weeks. First start with the feeder fully open and no movement on the treadle. Then partially open with a small amount of movement. Then a bit more until the lid is fully closed. They can be a bit noisy in operation so adding some felt pads under the lid and greasing the mechanism will help. You may have to adjust the balance as well, which you can do using self-adhesive weights which you can buy from a tyre fitter and sticking them under the treadle.
  7. I have an EE PAYG which was switched automatically from Orange when they stopped the service. As far as I am aware there is no requirement to top it up regularly, but it is very expensive to use from France, which I do, so top up £20 every 6 months or so. That's done via my EE internet account. When I went into the shop in England to change it before it was switched they said I needed a new SIM card but could definitely keep my old number. The new micro SIM needed an adaptor for my old phone which I had to pay £10 for, so didn't bother. But like you I must keep that number for security codes.
  8. Hybrids can start laying as early as 21 weeks and would normally lay right through Winter in their first year. As they get older they will stop for longer, so there is no hard rule about daylight hours as the weather will play a part as well. There is a good chance you will see the first eggs mid-November, which will be small to start with and will increase in size over 3 months. You may get a few without shells, which is perfectly normal when their system starts up either now or after a layoff.
  9. We're big fans of Strictly, although it's on a bit late for us. Also enjoy It Takes Two. The big European Hornets nest finally fell out of the poplar tree, having withstood several storms in the last year. Started to shed the outer skin but it was a surprise that the inside landed from 20 metres up with so little damage. The structure is amazing, with each layer of egg chambers hanging off the one above it. About the same diameter as a football.
  10. My guess is she squeezed under something. She should preen it out/ off herself.
  11. This is very weird. @Cattails (the poster system isn't working) I think it is best deleted.
  12. technique, which is a show bird norm, to resolve prolapses. But as Cattails says the problem could be worms. Unfortunately it can also just be the chicken out-of-sorts. We have one here (Speckledy) and despite worming and ensuring she has eaten and has an empty crop in the morning she still lays softies. We haven't resolved this yet.
  13. Feeding just wheat lowers the protein intake to just 8%; so far less than the 17% required. So your farmer is quite correct: at that level of protein they will stop laying. We have used this tequeniq
  14. In our case they have runs on grass which quickly becomes bare soil. They chose a spot and tear it up until is fine and loose. They do prefer it damp, particularly in Summer, but certainly not wet. So we don't provide baths as such, although other owners do. Chickens can throw the soil quite a distance, so whatever you provide needs high sides. An old tyre works well as it isn't necessary to have a base unless you are going to move it. An alternative to soil is 'play sand', which you can buy for children's sand pits.
  15. Very impressed with that @AndyRoo. Reminds me of my Grandparents house in Rugby, which I used to visit with my parents as a child. They had a building like that with a run at the front and an apple tree inside it. Another memory from there is that of watching my Mother dressing a fresh hen for dinner, which I presume my Grandfather had just killed and plucked. I remember her fishing out an egg! Bet I haven't remembered that for decades; amazing how living in such a quiet simple place allows you think.

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