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susanbb

Victorian Farm Christmas

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Have any of you seen 'Tales from a green valley', same team plus a couple more. It was set on a welsh farm during Elizabethan era. Again, knowledgeable people passing on information - no wannabe celebrities. I know it's available on Amazon, I bought it for my sister who missed it on TV.

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I watched Tales from the Green Valley too. I seem to remember that Peter Ginn was called "Fonz" in that (for some reason that wasn't entirely explained).

 

I haven't watched the Christmas Victorian Farm yet. I've been saving it up for a cosy evening by the woodburner.

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Did anyone see part two?

 

Loved the brown paper blanket :lol: My mum told me that my grandad used to tie paper around his legs in the winter for the extra warmth (he was a farm labourer). I used to cut out cardboard insoles for my wellies when I was younger, it stops the cold coming through so quick. I also used that fine bubble wrap but it goes flat very quickly :lol:

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Perhaps they never washed them that often. :? Maybe they aired them instead of washing. But there is a photo in one of the historical books that showed that when times were hard they used anything and everything to use as fillers including paper (which was in a hexagonal quilt).

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Just been watching the 1st episode on iplayer whilst I did my ironing. The dairymaid's fingernails were a bit jaw dropping. :shock:

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:vom: they were ghastly, weren't they? Wouldn't have allowed that in your days on the ward, eh Matron? :wink:

 

I remember quilting and doing patchwork with newspaper templates. we took them out though.

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I think it's Ruth's hands and not her daughter's - probably down to the veggie patch. Mind you I scrub mine before doing food. Makes you think twice before munching that bread.

I do like the donkey, but I wouldn't want to make bricks like that - poor guys must have been shattered - probably more so in that era.

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It was her daughters hand, and the nails were unbelievably long. :D No real dairymaid would have managed to keep nails like that! :lol:

 

Ruth's hands were the workers hands. :D

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I was fascinated by the brick making & Hubby pointed out that as our house is Victorian, & was a workers cottage, then all the bricks in the walls that we reused to make the fireplace, & the ones we sadly had to dig up from the brick floors,would have been made like that,which I thought was really cool.

Looking at the fireplace closely,you can see that they are hand made too.

 

I love this series :P

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When OH's cousin recently had her bathroom done they discovered that the sloping roof attached to the room consisted of pine branches - with the twigs still attached - like an indoor thatch (minus needles)! It is also quite old, origins unknown but probably a barn of sorts. It has been added to so many times and has really thick stone walls. No foundations either and a well under the kitchen floor - discovered when the old boiler was removed! Brilliant place - so many nooks and crannies. The last building work was done in the 1850's :D

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Our house is around 20 years old - I think the builders were drunk when they built it - nothing is straight! You should see our bathroom door frame - it's higher one side than the other - and quite obvious. :roll:

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Our house is around 20 years old - I think the builders were drunk when they built it - nothing is straight! You should see our bathroom door frame - it's higher one side than the other - and quite obvious. :roll:

 

Same here, Koojie. Nothing is straight here either. Ours is 15 years old and I think new houses can be worse than old ones sometimes!

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We also have an interesting lounge - the breeze blocks are showing through the outside walls - it looks like we live in a castle! :lol: Apparently the plasterer (according to my uncle) didn't seal it properly when slapping the stuff on. I guess corners were cut in more ways than one. I would love a cobb cottage.

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I was fascinated by the brick making & Hubby pointed out that as our house is Victorian, & was a workers cottage, then all the bricks in the walls that we reused to make the fireplace, & the ones we sadly had to dig up from the brick floors,would have been made like that,which I thought was really cool.

Looking at the fireplace closely,you can see that they are hand made too.

 

I love this series :P

 

I have several bricks built into the back of my Victorian house and in the side tunnel entry with fingerprints on, one has a whole hand print where it was picked up by the brickmaker 8)

 

Whilst boarding the loft I confirmed that the template used for my house was in fact a parallelogram, there are no square corners and the ceiling joists in the loft got further apart as I boarded towards the back of the house. :D

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I'm sorry buth this romantic view that old houses were all strong and well built is absolute codswallop. Our house in a Victorian 'new town' is so obviously 1900's 'Jerry built' that we are constantly finding builder' 'short cuts' - the bay windows were apparently stuck on last, and have no foundations! So don't feel shortchanged Koojie et al, at least you may have some chance of compensation from your builder, ours have been dead at least 100 years!

 

Love Victorian Farm and Victorian Christmas. Have just bought the Victorian Farm DVD for my (Archaeologist and all round historical weirdo) sister for Christmas for £15 from HMV. Bargain! Tempted to watch it all again myself before I wrap it though! :wink:

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Have only managed to watch the first episode so far. It was a bit odd that they were starting the Christmas show with haymaking which takes place in June. Even odder: apparently at the same time as haymaking, Ruth was making mincemeat with apples which cannot be harvested until September at the earliest and more likely October. Clearly, they did not turn up at the cottage in June and stay until Christmas. Or they did but bought the apples from Tesco!! If the Beeb want to foster the illusion that the good folks are actually living in the cottage, they should be more careful about such things.

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What I liked was the veggie patch - full of good sturdy veg growing - but at the beginning we saw that it had been grassed over - whoops continuity. Also finding the bellows - in a working condition that had been seemingly dumped in a derelict building seems rather like S"Ooops, word censored!"heap Challenge. I still like the programme even if we do spot the odd flaw.

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What I liked was the veggie patch - full of good sturdy veg growing - but at the beginning we saw that it had been grassed over - whoops continuity

 

The owner of the house grassed over the first veg plot,but showed her a patch of ground for a new one,& we saw her digging it over to get it ready for the veg :D

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