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Where do you draw the line between discipline and cruelty?

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The RSPCA have called and asked a few more questions to establish things... they said they probably won't visit until tomorrow morning now (that quickly!? :shock: ) ahhhh... nerve wracking.

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The RSPCA have called and asked a few more questions to establish things... they said they probably won't visit until tomorrow morning now (that quickly!? :shock: ) ahhhh... nerve wracking.

 

I am impressed with the rspca, ive watched all the programs, but i never thought they responded that quickly.

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The RSPCA have called and asked a few more questions to establish things... they said they probably won't visit until tomorrow morning now (that quickly!? :shock: ) ahhhh... nerve wracking.

 

I am impressed with the rspca, ive watched all the programs, but i never thought they responded that quickly.

I'm shocked too, when they asked for me by name and said they were returning the call I made today I almost forgot it could be them. :o:o:o

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Good that they are responding. They don't have a particularly good reputation for responding quickly. Just goes to show how seriously they are taking it.

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Mmm, I think it depends what area you're in - our RSPCA centre is quite central to Brighton and is probably able to respond to calls nearer their base quicker.

 

We rescued our first dog from a tip off from the RSPCA - a family had a dog and they had been banned from keeping pets. We phoned up to ask about rescuing a dog, and they just gave us the address of the family to go and have a look... the family just handed her over there and then :shock: my mum doesn't remember a follow up call, either.

 

A very bizarre situation, but this was 1991, protocol has probably changed since then :lol:

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Gosh, what a situation. I can't help but feel a bit sorry for this girl, by the sounds of it she's never had any structure, guidelines, security or maybe any positive role models in her own upbringing, hence she perhaps doesn't know any different.

 

But you've still done the right thing calling the RSPCA, they will be able to make the call as to whether they offer advice and leave the dog with this girl or whether it needs to be removed. Great news that they are responding so quickly, too.

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A number of off topic posts discussing the character and social class of the pet owner have been removed, please could you refrain from posting anything speculating on the owners social class or parenting abilities

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Oh I feel so sad for the puppy and the little boy. How is a puppy going to learn if its scared of its owner? Our old dog was a staffie mix and she was the sweetest thing. We got her from Battersea and she had obviously been mistreated before we had her, a total bag of nerves.

 

Well done for calling. I think you did the right thing.

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I've not heard anything from the girl yet... :think: all I will say, is her parents are lovely, I think this is an attitude thing, rather than a background thing.

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If you have a concern - regardless of what it is - you should report it. It's then up to the relevant authority to investigate and make any relevant decisions.

At least then you know you've brought your concerns to the attention of (in this case) the RSPCA and have done all you can for the time being.

It does worry me when people think that hitting is the way to discipline a dog. And I hate to hear of Staffies being handled so harshly. Yes, they need strict discipline and PROPER training, but that doesn't mean physical punishment.

My brother (a policeman) has two staffies and they are adorable. But they had good training as puppies and are still handled firmly but definitely not cruelly.

And I don't like to hear of them being associated with the Dangerous Dogs Act either - they're not dangerous dogs and are actually not aggressive as a breed. But so many people think they are and my brother and sis-in-law get fed up with people asking them about that. They are actually great with children, so your neighbour could actually have a very good dog where her young son is concerned.

However, due to staffies (and other breeds) being kept by some less desirable humans as status / protection dogs, they do get a bad name and as they are more often than not trained to be aggressive, they inevitably are.

When treated cruelly, a staffie will more than likely become aggressive - but so would any other dog. Equally, without training and discipline, any dog will be badly behaved and unable to be controlled.

So by reporting your concerns, this dog may be 'saved' in many ways - from harsh treatment (not necessarily being removed, though, just through education) and from a potentially worse fate if it were to 'snap' and bite someone through sheer fear and self-protection.

I do hope the RSPCA can resolve this and that the dog will receive better treatment and that your neighbour will be a bit more educated (in the care of her dog, I mean).

Sorry to have gone on a bit!

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I've not heard anything, either at work, or from the RSPCA.

 

Today the girl in question was complaining about how affectionate and well... baby-like, the pup is, saying if anyone wanted to snatch him he'd be jumping about and slobbering all over them and they could quite easily manage it.

 

I said "ah yeah, staffies are notoriously cuddly friendly things, aren't they"

 

 

she replied with "no! if someone sees a staffie in your garden they won't go in there, they're aggressive!"

 

this annoyed me, I wanted to say "only if you keep hitting them and making them that way" - but I bit my tongue.

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I have read through this post feeling frankly sick. What really disturbs me is that by the sound of things your work colleague actually enjoys brutalising this poor dog and is proud of it. :shock::shock: I think there is absolutely no doubt, Squiffs, that you have done the right thing! I don't think it is just ignorance that is causing your work colleague to maltreat (and, yes, that is what it is) her poor young dog. She clearly lacks all empathy.

 

As others have said there might also be a grim link to her childcare there too. If there is then the RSPCA will spot it.

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we have a puppy and if you come round the back of the house she will stick her head out of the catflap i find it very sweet

poor puppy : [

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