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Pipichick

Friend had lung transplant 27th April - UPDATE

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A friend of mine has just come out of surgery after receiving a lung transplant this afternoon. She has been waiting for over two years, and has had 3 false alarms. The surgeons have said today went well and they are hopeful she will be out of critical care by Tuesday :pray:

Lots of her friends are posting on Facebook, wishing her a speedy recovery but also thanking and bearing in mind somewhere out there is a group of people (family & friends) that are currently going through hell, and yet they have passed on the generous gift of new life to others. I truly hope these people get to hear and realise that their gifts of life are greatly appreciated, not just by the person receiving the organ(s) but by their family and friends.

So in an attempt to say thank you to a group of people I will never directly be able to thank, I thought I would post on here and say a massive thanks to anyone who has been in that horrific position of losing a loved one but agreeing to organ donation, or to those people who have signed up to the organ donor list. :clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

Edited by Guest

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I am in total agreement and have been for many years. Although as I am getting older I am running out of decent bits worth giving away :oops:

Would like to be able to donate the whole lot to science for students to work on, but so far hubby is completely against it.

I hope your friend makes a full recovery, prospects are so good these days, and I second your thank you to all who carry donor cards and have signed up for the register.

 

 

We try and do blood drives in work, and it makes me mad the number of people who won't go because they are scared of needles. (Not phobic, thats different entirely) They wouldn't be scared if they needed the blood going in. Out of 24 I get about 5 volunteers.

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I've been on the organ donor register since I was 15 and carry my card in my wallet. I love hearing stories about successful organ transplants and love the idea that I could affect so many peoples lives so positively if anything terrible ever happened (multiple organs helping multiple patients, and of course they all have family and friends).

I am scared of needles, but like you say Duncan08, I would not be too scared to received blood if I needed it so I was looking forward to donating blood and joining the bone marrow register but unfortunately found out I'm below the required weight :doh: I am a perfectly healthy weight for my height, but I'm only just 5'.

 

May I ask what she needed the transplant for? Obviously I understand its personal. One of my friends lived in Canada for over a year, and made a good friend over there with cystic fibrosis who has been on the waiting list for several years now. :pray:

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This subject is very close to my heart. Like Duncan08, I find recruiting people very hard...people have their own reasons for not donating but some of the reasons I hear for not doing it make me gasp...I am on every register going,& madly, I want to get that call to help; Sadly, in reality it will be someone who has deceased in an accident or something similar... :(

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May I ask what she needed the transplant for? Obviously I understand its personal. One of my friends lived in Canada for over a year, and made a good friend over there with cystic fibrosis who has been on the waiting list for several years now. :pray:

 

She suffers from CF, as do I, hence the double lung transplant. She is my inspiration, so brave, working so hard to stay healthy, to the point surgeons were so close to ruling her out because her lungs were too damaged ?! BUT she would have no chance if there weren't selfless people out there. I would hate to be in that position, losing a loved one so suddenly and having someone come to me to discuss transplant, hence my post. :roll: (blinking back tears) x

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((hugs)) It's a tricky subject. When we lost my MIL 6 years ago she had said she would donate any organ to help someone after she had gone...unfortunately there was anything that could be used :cry:

 

Myself & my hubby are both on the organ donor register. Sadly mine are all pretty much shot (& not through abuse may I add) but hopefully OH bits are in better shape :oops::lol::lol:

 

I would love to think that once I had finished with my body that someone else could benefit from any parts. :)

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Surfer chicken, it drives me mad, but loads of my recruits have been rejected. Underweight-for blood donation- then I have had people diagnosed with anemia. Then the nurse shot the vein. I won't go with them any more :lol: I'm a curse!

I just give them free hours and hope they get through :oops:

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Pipichick best wishes to your friend, I hope she makes a full recovery.

 

It is so difficult when someone losses a loved one especially so if it is sudden, so diificult to be asked and also for the staff who do the asking but thank you to all of them who give others the chance of a better life.

 

I hope that those who do consent to organs being used gain some comfort from the fact that another life has been saved.

 

Chrissie

 

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For years I looked after heart patients in OPD who had had transplants - very much in its infancy. Hope your friend goes on ok. Not sure any of my bits are any good - I seem to creak etc like I need oiling :lol:

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There is a lovely lady who I follow on Twitter. She had her much needed lung transplant last year. She really struggles with the sense of guilt and she worries about how her donors family are feeling. I am sure they must feel hugely relieved that the death of their loved one has given life to others. It's wonderful to read about her now being able to do the things most of us take for granted. She ran for a bus this week!

 

I hope your friend recovers well and is running for a bus soon!

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Thanks for the support and it's so comforting to hear people are on the organ donation register, as many of you have stated I have also signed up (but doubt I will have much that would be of benefit) as have lots of my family & friends. I take the attitude if you are willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate :D

My friend is doing well :clap::clap: She woke up briefly late last night complaining of back pain so was dosed up on morphine. here's hoping she is chasing down those buses very soon :)

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Wishing your friend a speedy recovery. The loss of a loved one is difficult but they must be reassured that their loved one has given life to others. I carry a donor card and would be happy to help if possible.

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Her cousin has been to visit her at Papworth today. She is already out of Critical Care, sitting up, talking and even risking an NHS cheese sandwich :D Tomorrow, the physios are going to help her take her first steps. I am so very proud to have such a strong and determined young woman as my friend.

I truly hope the courageous family of the donor will take some comfort in this fantastic progress.

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Absolutely echo the need to carry a donor card, and make sure your next of kin knows you do, otherwise it may not be found until it is too late.

 

I also have cystic fibrosis, almost 54 years of age. Thankfully I don't need a transplant (too old to be considered for one anyway), but so many people do. I carry a donor card as although my lungs are no good, my kidneys and other organs are likely to be of use, should the worst happen to me, and there are people with other problems who also need transplants.

 

So please, carry a donor card, and make sure people know that you do! Good luck to your friend, and hope she recovers quickly and there are no problems with rejection.

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I really hope your friend makes a full recovery.

 

I am also very impressed by all of you who carry donor cards. I give blood happily but have to confess to tearing my donor card up... When my first husband was killed in a RTA he did not have his donor card on him and although probably his organs would not have been any good as he was pronounced dead at the scene, I'm only slightly ashamed to admit that I was glad not to have to have had "that" conversation. The shock of his death at 27 years old was enough to cope with, without his organs being taken...and no sorry, I wouldn't have felt any comfort in their being used for someone else, either then, or retrospectively now.

 

And so like you I really really take my hat off to those people who can say yes in those situations....I know I wouldn't have been able to.

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Again, thank to everyone for their good wishes. My friend is now doing laps of the hospital ward and apparently worrying about her hair & make up, so things are looking good. :D

 

Sadietoo, I am so sorry to read about the sudden loss of your first husband, I really can't imagine what you went through, and so young too.

 

Docsquid, goodness almost 54!!! That is inspiring in itself, you must be over 100 in 'normal' years :lol: I'm 36 and at last hospital visit the spirometer aged my lungs at 66yrs... Great :roll: Any tips for surviving CF greatly appreciated, as long as it doesn't involve giving up red wine :anxious:

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Glad your friend is worried about her hair. Always a good sign. I really hope everything goes well for her.

 

Don't give up red wine! Definitely an important part of my treatment ;)

 

What has kept me going is exercise and sport. Even now, with lung function about 46% normal, I hammer my lungs every day by doing spinning or walking around our wildlife conservation site and doing physical work there, like chopping logs, stacking brash piles etc. In the past did a lot more, including a half marathon, 100k bicycle ride and part time fitness instructing (not any more). Mucking out the chickens is also good work!

 

I also don't miss any of my treatment. Well, maybe have a day off once a year...but literally do everything, even though it takes hours every day. It was harder before I took early retirement as work took a lot of time out of the day and then I had to do all the exercise and treatments.

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