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my mob aint happy after 2 days on lock down yesterday as it was a miserable damp day I didn't let them out and they weren't that bothered today was a different matter sun was out I'm home and their in the runs all day the boys have been complaining most of the morning it's going to be a very long 4 weeks if it stays dry cold and sunny

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The hens move in and out between the cube and the run at will. It's covered with tarps, and I've never seen wild birds in the run... they have a separate bird feeder and bird bath on our patio, so they target that instead.

 

I also find this ruling completely bizarre because I am willing to bet that the vast majority of domestic chicken owners wouldn't even be aware of the rule. If I hadn't clicked the link through pure curiosity I wouldn't have had a clue and I've have carried on blissfully unaware.

 

The main thing is they they shouldn't be exposed to droppings from wild birds, so a covered run is what is needed. TBH all runs should at least have a covered area, if not be totally covered (depending on size of course), and not just for this sort of eventuality; chickens don't do well in wet litter, and bacteria will start to breed quickly if the litter is wet.

 

A tip; if you're buying a new run, or just planning new housing, always buy a bigger run than you think you might need - this is always a possibility, and overcrowding will lead to stress and then they are more likely to get ill.

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Bit worried about this as I'm due to clean them out at the weekend and that involves having to let them out of the run so I can dismantle the eglu etc. Ive only got two chooks so run is too small to do all this inside without squishing them (they are nosey). Suppose it would be ok for about an hour since the wild birds will keep away whilst im out there...

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Can you shut the eglu door while you clean it out, with them in the run? That's what i have done in the past.

 

Remember, that as they are spending longer in the run, you will need to be careful to use ground sanitising powder on the litter, and rake it through once a week.

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My eglu is fully inside the run on a table top, so I have to get in the run to clean it out and its only 2m square so a bit tricky...OH says je would just risk it still and let them out but I don't want them to catch anything from the friendly sparrows! Oh well. Fun for me on Saturday morning then!

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Reading so much online and on FB about people thinking it's all rubbish and it doesn't apply to back garden hens.

 

Whilst there is currently no reported issues of avian flu here, following the rules may just save the life of your hens. It may come to nothing and let's hope that's the case but I just want to share some of the things I am reading online and you can judge for yourselves.

 

"It's doesn't affect garden chickens, only commercial flocks."

Not true.

 

"My garden is tiny it won't affect me as my girls are not actually moving anywhere."

Not true.

 

"I can shoo the wild birds away and it won't affect me."

Not true.

 

"This is unfair. It's just trying to make us spend money on runs we don't have."

Not true.

 

"Free range eggs in supermarkets are not free range now."

Not true.

 

Also, so many whinging about not having a run. When I was researching my chicken coop and chicken keeping, well over a year before I got them, I was advised to think about a covered WIR. Some people remember the kerfuffle and arguments I had with my OH over a solid roof on the run.

 

I know life isn't always this simple but please research before getting chickens. We have previous history of avian flu outbreaks in the UK with culls and lock downs. If you don't have somewhere covered, please now create somewhere.

 

Someone I saw this morning posted on a page that we are all going a bit far and there is more chance of dead birds through them being cooped up.

 

I am no expert and am not trying to preach, but please be sensible. We are all responsible and it only takes one or two mistakes and this could be serious. It applies to us all, even those people with gardens that are small!

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Thank you!!!!

 

I am also getting rather annoyed at people emailing me with the same problems... who on earth would set up a flock with no run at all????!! :roll:

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As I understand it he multiple outbreaks in the South of France were caused by a feed delivery truck going first to an infected farm and then infecting all the others on the route.

 

Sadly I know many people with chickens and no covered runs. They continue like that until the first fox strike.

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DM, hmmm...a battery farm. Yes, who would....no point in keeping them.And for the rewards you get in both eggs and hentertainment :lol: they are the best thing we have ever kept. :)

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Sadly I know many people with chickens and no covered runs. They continue like that until the first fox strike.

 

Sadly true.

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covered runs have been recommended since at least 2008 that's when I first started to think about and started to build my first run

re the feed truck it wont be the first time something so simple has been the cause of cross contamination and or a major out break in the UK one foot and mouth out break was supposed to been traced back to a broken drain pipe

I was thinking about free range eggs and how long birds have to be confined for them to be no longer technically free range! as I fried up a couple of my pullet eggs this morning

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I understand free range status is protected for 6 weeks if birds have to be confined.

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Hope everyone and their girls are coping with this situation! I have a question about the extent of run coverings required though, is a full length eglu run cover sufficient or does it need to reach the ground on both sides?

 

Also I have a walk in run with a covered roof, but again, do I need to add further coverings on the sides (leaving adequate ventilation of course)

 

Thanks!

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Hope everyone and their girls are coping with this situation! I have a question about the extent of run coverings required though, is a full length eglu run cover sufficient or does it need to reach the ground on both sides?

 

Also I have a walk in run with a covered roof, but again, do I need to add further coverings on the sides (leaving adequate ventilation of course)

 

Thanks!

just the roof as long as wild birds can't get into the run then the sides should be OK

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I think we have to use a big dollop of common sense here, and be open to people with different setups and viewpoints to our own.

 

It's hardly fair to criticise people without covered runs if they don't normally need them - I've had chickens for three years and have never lost one to a predator, and they free-range all day and every day, without supervision. (But yes, I do have a covered run for the nights).

 

Also, without covering your runs with tiny-meshed netting, you can't keep out all wild birds - sparrows get through the tight mesh of an Eglu run quite easily. (But sparrows aren't the problem.)

 

Also, my main concern is not to save my ladies (though I want them to stay healthy) - I get them from a local farm to give them as good and as long a life as I can, in any case better and longer than they would have got on that farm. My main concern is to prevent any spread. Whether there's bird flu around or not, I don't use the boots I use in the chicken run outside the grounds of my house, and I am punctilious to wash my hands thoroughly after being near chickens or handling eggs (thanks Edwina). I don't go anywhere near any other flocks or near anybody with any other flocks. Should my ladies get affected (and I don't think they will even though there is bird flu in this area) then I am sure the spread will stop here.

 

No need to panic!

 

Famous last words ;-)

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Anyone know if we need agriculture disinfectant for foot bath or is something from the supermarket efficient eg Jeyes (keep away from girls). Thanks

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Better with something like Virkon - but if you use special shoes/Wellies and dont use for anything other than these in the garden for the chickens I would imagine you dont need to disinfect them - I am not anyhow as I use a special pair of crocs to go in my garden for the chickens and no where else. They also go in the washing machine so would be ok.

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there's also this one Viratec P it was mentioned in an email from Cotswold I had earlier in the week

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Cheers all I'll find it. I wasn't aware it's toxic to cats. There's a couple of sweet kitties that stalk my chickens and are always setting them into a panic in the run so .......................... No I wouldn't :lol:

 

I don't visit other hens at the moment but there is the risk of carrying soiled material from the garden into the run on my shoes so I will be using it. No big deal having a cat tray for standing in before going in the run.

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You're right Plum... no big deal.

 

It always sets everyone aflutter when AI rears its ugly head, but in reality it only needs a few small changes.

 

So long as you have planned wisely, you'll have a covered run that's big enough for them to have plenty of space, and this period can be used to do their quarterly worming as well. Mine seemed a tad miffed at being shut in to start with, but in reality, the days are short now, so they are spending much of the day in their run at any rate..

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The shorter days do make it easier. I only have to see their sad / cross / bored faces at the weekends because I'm rarely at home during daylight hours in the week!

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