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On the subject of having runs...

 

Our allotment flock has (or, more accurately, had) 1 and a half allotments which were surrounded by Heras fencing and electric fencing. No roof, ni need until now,

 

It's impossible to cover an area that big, so we've ended up building a smaller run, inside their normal area, with Heras panels. We've had to put Heras panels down the middle, and heras panels on the top to support the weight of tarpaulins. Everything has then be covered with a fine mesh net, right down to the floor. It's still a large area (about 50 sq metres).

 

It's been hard work (and not cheap), but we're doing to because it's the right thing to do. It doesn't matter how low the risk of our birds contracting the disease is, it has to be done. If we hadn't had the panels, we would have improvised and used pallets or anything, even if it wasn't human height.

 

It has to be done. Anyone not doing it is not just putting their birds at risk If anything happens - if the disease is even suspected then birds all birds in a radius will be culled.

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Exactly... i nearly lost my rag today with a woman who is refusing to shut her birds in a run, in fact she has no run at all; they just hop out of the coop and potter around the garden. She says that she doesn't think that it applies to garden flocks and that hers aren't at risk.

 

Give

 

me

 

Strength :roll:

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Yes.

A fellow plot owner who keeps chickens onhis plot told my husband that he didn't need to do anything to his plot, the BBC told him that netting over the top is sufficient.

 

It was like talking to a brick wall.

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"If the disease is even suspected then birds all birds in a radius will be culled."

 

Is that the case? Even when there is no contact between the flocks? As the virus isn't transmittable through air, it seems like a very blunt instrument. I'm not sure but I think here in Germany only the infected flocks are culled.

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In 2014 surrounding flocks were culled too. This year hasn't happened yet. Only three duck farms in the south were affected. The neighbouring chicken farms stayed clear of the virus.

That's one example why scientist think this strain is only very virulent in water fowl and not so much in chickens.

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The zones recommended for culling seem to vary depending on which starin of the virus is present. The culling zone can be as wide as 5km for the 'epicentre' of an outbreak, but can widen if there are mass and widespread cases. The exclusion zone beyond that has a likewise fluid radius, and this is decided when the virus type has been decided.

 

Just thank your lucky stars that you don't live in Japan, where there is massive culling after a terrific outbreak.

 

There is currently no need to panic in the UK, there have been no cases reported...yet. If we are diligent with this prevention zone, then we may be lucky, but we do all need to take responsibility to read up on the matter and take all necessary precautions.

 

It is only sensible to ensure that you have a run which can be used to contain your birds in this type of situation. It needs to be covered and large enough for them all to be contained in it 24/7 for what could possibly be a long period of time. On the last but one outbreak, we were in the inner restriction zone, so shutdown - no transport of birds, all poultry outlets were on shutdown too. My birds were in the run 24/7 for 6 weeks, but they were healthy, alive and there was no spread of the disease outside the epicentre.

 

Yesterday, i visited my local outlet... they'd offered payment of a Christmas tree if I went to check on their precautions; pleased to say that they are remaining open, and have footbaths in place, protective clothing, restricted entry to the poultry barns, and all birds, even the ducklings are under cover.

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culling requirements will vary from country to country

it makes a change for DEFRA to be a head of the game and put a precautionary ban in place before an out break so someone's doing their job properly for a change so a small :clap: is in order

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This must be the plans and measures that are being put in place while flocks are kept inside for 30 days. Have to wait and see and pray it doesn't happen here.

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On a lighter note, no free ranging and doing intros at the same time is doing my lot the world of good.....8 eggs yesterday :) ...not bad from the potential 9 laying birds at the moment. Back to 4 eggs today. Plus new girls Darcy and Alijaz mingling nicely with the older girls today :)

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I have to say that I find this all rather crazy. After 30 days we will be releasing our birds back into an environment full of wild birds that may have been infected during that 30 day period :roll: No only that but the ground will have been contaminated with the migrating birds. Places like Slimbridge and other wild fowl collections are not being restricted and they will come into contact with wild birds in their hundreds. I think that there will some serious welfare issues for those that have free range birds. There are farms with hundreds of free range turkeys etc that will only have sufficient space for overnighting.

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I have to say that I find this all rather crazy. After 30 days we will be releasing our birds... .

 

Not sure we will be releasing them after 30 days, CM. I suspect it will depend what happens in the interim.

 

I would guess that the "30 days" is to give DEFRA a marker, and after that time they will either continue as is, or will introduce more stringent measurement. (Or they might let the burds out,of course).

 

"30 days" is short enough to not cause too much panic, apart from the initial furore we've all seen. This also means that DEFRA only have to deal with the initial "I can't possibly contain my birds" and "surely it doesn't apply to me" and "god aren't they overreacting" noise right now, and they can defer the "oh my god i'm going to lose my free range status" until an extension is announced.

 

That's what I believe, anyway, lol.

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also 28-30 days is SOP for a minimum assessment for Government departments time scales for results from any lab tests might also play a part. plus with Christmas New Year holidays going to get in the way it's probably why the announcement/order was issued when it was

any measures needed in the event of an outbreak should all ready exist it's just the implementation and mobilization that needs planning which is a lot easier and cheaper if you've got time to plan rather than react to an unexpected situation

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Agreed, it's good to see them planning for once instead of being caught out and slapping on emergency measures as has happened before. I do agree with some of what CM has said, but it is what it is, and right now they are trying to prevent the disease from spreading here from mainland Europe.

 

It is all a bit 'thumb in dyke', but they are buying time. This problem is largely seasonal, so may show signs of abating by then (personally i don't think it will) but it is way better than causing any more panic by slapping on longer lasting restrictions at this stage.

 

And for the record, i am going to lamp the next person who smirks at me and asks if I have killed my birds yet :roll::evil:

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trouble is We've still got the spring migration if the situation in Europe isn't cured We might be in the same place again in a couple of months

Dogmother do you know how long the incubation time for AI is ? as I assume that'll one of the factors in any dissensions on when the current order is lifted or extended

I also assume that the ministry vets are taking samples from the wild bird population

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The incubation period is up to a week sjp, but it's one of those things which has symptoms that could also be any number of other illnesses... think of your child with a cough, temperature and runny nose - could be anything.

 

Death from AI is pretty quick, and the first indicator of its presence (outside of commercial farming where the farmer [we would hope] is more vigilant) is the report of dead birds in the countryside. So die-off in backyard flocks would be the initial indicator I guess.

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The incubation period is up to a week sjp, but it's one of those things which has symptoms that could also be any number of other illnesses... think of your child with a cough, temperature and runny nose - could be anything.

 

Death from AI is pretty quick, and the first indicator of its presence (outside of commercial farming where the farmer [we would hope] is more vigilant) is the report of dead birds in the countryside. So die-off in backyard flocks would be the initial indicator I guess.

thank you mostly helps don't have kids so no benchmark in that respect but I think I know what you mean basically don't panic

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Remeber that my birds technically should have been under cover, so practically inside, for the past month or so. And there is no end in sight yet. A farm in Friesland was found to be infected today. Luckily far far away from me.

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My understanding is that it can be carried by any birds, but that waterfowl are the main vector, happy to be corrected on this. I very much doubt that it is only transmitted by robins though :lol::roll:

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My understanding is that it can be carried by any birds, but that waterfowl are the main vector, happy to be corrected on this. I very much doubt that it is only transmitted by robins though :lol::roll:

 

Thanks DM, I thought it was mostly ducks too.

 

Watch out for Robin redbreast on all those Christmas cards :lol::lol:

(sorry, I do know it's a serious matter, but couldn't resist)

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