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Valkyrie

M&S and Oakham Farm

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For those who haven't heard there is footage about disgusting conditions that their poultry have been kept in. I have complained on Facebook and I really think that the authorities should stop the pandering to big corporations and do spot checks on these vile, unethical and immoral goings on. To say that M&S are unaware is really beyond belief. If that is the case then they cannot be trusted to deal with the public. If you don't know what happens with your food at source then that is bad practice.

 

Mods you'll probably want to switch it to the chicken page but I feel rather too strongly about this - it's not just chickens - it's the shop's standards - if they are blind to the way the livestock are cared for (or not) then what happens to the rest of the food they produce?

 

I'd rather like to flood their facebook page - please feel free to add your pennyworth and complain - or even email them - am so cross at the moment (understatement).

 

And those that want to attempt to look it's Oakham Farm - I couldn't watch it all. It is indeed very upsetting in the first few seconds. You may say that's the drama that the people shooting the film wanted. Maybe but however it is shot - you wouldn't get the footage if it didn't exist. And I want that to stop. I shall also be writing to my MP - he'll be so fed up with me at this rate! :lol:

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Oh no!

 

Now I feel bad for buying my Turkey crown from them!

 

This is definitely one thing I miss about moving here from my old town. Just outside where I used to live there was a great little butchers who sourced all their stuff from their own farms: beef, pork, boar, chicken, turkey, and goose. They were quite pricey, but totally worth it. And you could even visit their farms!

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Well said Kooj. There are a few responding to my posts on the M&S FB page but I don't have millions of friends or followers and this has to go viral. I really thought they were above this kind of treatment, how very naive of me. I've asked them to remove all Oakham Farm produce from their shelves. A little voice in my head said "good luck with that one"

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Totally with you on this one K

 

My dad buys their Oakham chicken because he thinks it's free range... the label looks farmy etc. I have given up trying to educate him, and he is doing his best to cook for himself and feed my mother too.

 

We need to encourage people to vote with their feet and not buy any of this stuff. This is just the tip of the iceberg!

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Absolutely right Dogmother..... I've been a huge M&S supporter over the years. How they react to this will dictate whether I remain so.

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Exackerly!! I always say that you don't judge the person by the mistake, but rather by how they deal with it.

 

Could facebookers please keep me informed?

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This just in....

 

We are very disappointed to see the images & take this issue very seriously. As an immediate action we've suspended supply from these farms while we investigate this thoroughly. We work hard to uphold higher welfare standards which is recognised by leading animal charities. We’ll take all necessary steps to ensure these standards are maintained.

 

 

 

I really hope they do!

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Ive just been reading the posts after seeing Vals on FB. It doesn't surprise me m&s are selling food with this sort of background. I remember going to buy a gammon joint, but after checking the back it said it was from Dutch pork, and I have heard dubious things about their animal welfare.

 

I hope they reply, and do something about it, but I really doubt it.

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Ive just been reading the posts after seeing Vals on FB. It doesn't surprise me m&s are selling food with this sort of background. I remember going to buy a gammon joint, but after checking the back it said it was from Dutch pork, and I have heard dubious things about their animal welfare.

 

I hope they reply, and do something about it, but I really doubt it.

 

Well done, you! I NEVER buy Dutch or Danish pork/bacon/gammon etc and would rather go without! I have seen much in the past about very dubious standards of welfare and, even when welfare is fairly good, that the pigs are kept indoors on concrete with straw totally against their natural behaviour patterns. Equally, we have a couple of pig farms locally so I prefer to support our own industry; I love driving by and seeing the pigs out in the fields rootling around! So I only buy British OUTDOOR reared now!

 

Cynically, I can't believe that M and S didn't know about welfare standards at these chicken suppliers! Even if they actually, really didn't its still shocking in that they should be monitoring and doing their own spot checks etc. Ignorance is no excuse :shameonu:

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Wow thanks.... :eh:

Not saying ALL Dutch pigs are raised decently, but mostly not any different from big pig farms in UK. There is also free range Dutch pork. In the Netherlands most animal products get a star rating from the animal welfare organisations. One star complies with european laws, and three stars is freen range animals with lots of enrichment.

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No offence meant, Cat Tails, just going by what I have seen reported on the media over here. Also I am sure that you would prefer to support your country's farmers as we do too so really nothing personal! There are good and bad everywhere but, personally, I want to buy British, outdoor reared meat with the highest possible welfare standards and its not always easy to tell, from labels, what that is!

 

With the Dutch and Danish pork in our (well, my certainly!) supermarkets there is no indication of anything further than country of origin (certainly not the star system that Cat Tails mention - which sounds easy to understand and eminently sensible - ) and it is always rather less expensive than the outdoor British which, sadly, leads me to believe that it is the lower end of the welfare chain.

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Also, I meant no offence to you. I wasn't aware of the grading system over there. Maybe if they labeled their meat in that way, we would be more informed as to its upbringing. I do however think the majority of the Dutch pork sold on our supermarkets is not from a higher welfare farm, mainly due to the quantity on the shelves, and the amount they are sold at, ie super cheap. There is no way I could buy an equivalent piece of British pork gammon for the price a Dutch piece would cost.

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I do partly blame the big companies that put a low margin on the price of food - it just means the farmer cuts costs somewhere and in this case it's welfare. Not everyone is as lucky as I am for living in the sticks - goodness knows how I'd manage in the city - but then ordering online would be next best thing. Not all small farms are good - remember that pig farmer that started off the foot and mouth a few years back - only to be followed soon after all was under control by either the American or English research station that poured infected test residue into the water and started up the second lot of F&M!

But it seems to me the larger and more intensive rearing the farm, then animal welfare is low on the list - then again that doesn't apply to all. I do think that spot checks should be the way so that it keeps these people on their toes. Just makes me so mad that anyone can complain about a neighbour who they think is mistreating an animal and the RSPCA is there like a shot - and find that isn't always the case. Wouldn't that be great if they did that with farms too - and then if all's well then that's good. If it's bad news then whoever is involved in mistreating their livestock should have the whole farm confiscated and given to someone that does care and would appreciate a step on the farming ladder.

 

Had to have a bit of a cooling off session! Sadly Cloots I don't think they will be looking into this matter for long - it'll be a case of wait till the furore dies down and blinkers will be put back on.

 

Thank you peeps for the back up though.xxxxx

 

I generally try and buy locally to reduce food miles too. If I go in a shop and see calabrese from Spain or Peru next to calabrese from Herefordshire then Hereford it is. Why would I buy mushrooms from Northern Ireland when they also come from Dorset or Sussex? I do try and support a local veg and fruit farm too, but it's a bit of a trip sometimes. We try and tie it in with a walking session - we still have big sacks of spuds from there to use so haven't bought any in the shops for ages! And the sprouts are looking good in the garden! :drool:

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I'm definitely all for buying as possible. But like you said Valkyrie, it isn't always easy! And over here definitely more expensive. And somehow I never seem able to buy local bananas... they are always out... :roll::wink:

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:lol: Yup those darned bananas! I agree it is very difficult and I have a taste for dates - I'm not sure if they have enough date palms in Cornwall!

We have been so spoilt with wonderful exotic items and things that we love but are out of season. It's so difficult to get into the swing of eating what is growing now. Basically green stuff and salads. We definitely need fruit but those blueberries from South Africa are calling me . . .

Luckily we have a freezer full of home growns and home baked summer things. Like quiches now that the little blighters have stopped laying. :roll: But then we have to say nooooo at some point because his lordship needs to freeze the whey from his cheese making - saves it for his ricotta - and very nice it is too! Milk comes from a farm up the road and get this - the cream is floating on the top just like in olden days! :lol:

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Yummmm, we get milk like that from a local organic farm too - takes me right back to my childhood, and the milk freezing so that the cream rises up out of the bottle.

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I have a dairy farm close to my house too and have been tempted... but really don't need the calories of full fat milk... :shameonu:

And the Netherlands produces so much milk, I would be hard pressed to find any foreign milk. :wink:

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I generally try and buy locally to reduce food miles too. If I go in a shop and see calabrese from Spain or Peru next to calabrese from Herefordshire then Hereford it is.

 

I'm a strong believer in buying locally produced food where possible, and for a o=long time I ouldn't buy stuff that travelled a ridiculous distance. Then I realised that there is more than just food miles to consider on food purchases. For some countries, the food they produce is one of the few things (or the major thing) they have which they can trade. If we (everyone) just reject long-distance food without considering this, we could cause a country's fragile economy to collapse.

 

I also then started to wonder why I was being so hard on food, when I'd be happy to buy a car, or spares for a car, which had not been made locally. And electrical goods. And wine. And clothes. And...well..pretty much anything really. I do still tend to buy food grown locally, but I also buy apples from New Zealand (for example) becauseI know it's an important part of the New Zealand economy.

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I generally try and buy locally to reduce food miles too. If I go in a shop and see calabrese from Spain or Peru next to calabrese from Herefordshire then Hereford it is.

 

I'm a strong believer in buying locally produced food where possible, and for a o=long time I ouldn't buy stuff that travelled a ridiculous distance. Then I realised that there is more than just food miles to consider on food purchases. For some countries, the food they produce is one of the few things (or the major thing) they have which they can trade. If we (everyone) just reject long-distance food without considering this, we could cause a country's fragile economy to collapse.

 

I also then started to wonder why I was being so hard on food, when I'd be happy to buy a car, or spares for a car, which had not been made locally. And electrical goods. And wine. And clothes. And...well..pretty much anything really. I do still tend to buy food grown locally, but I also buy apples from New Zealand (for example) becauseI know it's an important part of the New Zealand economy.

 

That's called being a responsible informed customer, and I agree totally. No-one has all the right answers, so I won't berate someone for doing something differently to me. If I hear a sensible reason for changing the way I do things, I'll change. The only two things I have a problem with are people ignoring moral issues due to apathy and people trying to impose their opinions on me.

 

Even in this thread, it's plainly obvious that we all have slightly different approaches to tackling how to source our food responsibly. However, everyone is making a conscious effort to do the right thing, and that reassures me greatly.

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I feel the closer to home, the more control over what I consume is of utmost importance - like what is sprayed on (for the most part organic as much as possible). I will buy Granny Smith apples from South Africa, but not Italy - they just don't have the right amount of sharpness or crispiness to me. New Zealand Braeburns are yum. But I do enjoy the old varieties such as Peasgood Nonsuch and Egremont Russet, Ribston Pippin and Blenheim Orange - that we used to have in the garden. James Grieve is the only one left - pretty blossom but nothing to cross pollinate with. Loved them - trees didn't love my garden though and we had quite a few old varieties so that they could be in the same pollination groups. They did OK for a short while and then went meh - I blame something in our soil as there are a fair few trees and shrubs that do well and then keel over!

 

There are 2 ways of thinking and I just don't know what to choose - enjoy what you like while it lasts or try and adapt to what can only be grown here once the methods of shipping and air miles are stopped with regard to fuel - or lack of it!

 

But on the animal welfare front - they must be treated right and dispatched humanely. Now I'm not a lover of beef and we have attempted to try. I would like to say that the difference of flavour of meat hung for weeks rather than 5 minutes is infinitely better - and not tough either! Farmers markets are good ways to learn about different meats and what they have to offer and welfare - if they allow you to visit their farm, that's a good start.

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I think that the major has hit the nail on the head; we all do what we can, in our individual circumstances. I am another one irritated by complacency and ignorance.

 

How's this for food miles... the other week a deer bolted out of cover in OH's paddock, normally they jump the river and get away, but this one didn't. The dogs had locked on before i could call them off and it was a very quick end. I got butchering and there's now a freezer full of venison with food miles of about 200 yards! I don't mind working then on the rabbits, but let's hope they don't make a habit if the deer

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I think that the major has hit the nail on the head; we all do what we can, in our individual circumstances. I am another one irritated by complacency and ignorance.

 

How's this for food miles... the other week a deer bolted out of cover in OH's paddock, normally they jump the river and get away, but this one didn't. The dogs had locked on before i could call them off and it was a very quick end. I got butchering and there's now a freezer full of venison with food miles of about 200 yards! I don't mind working then on the rabbits, but let's hope they don't make a habit if the deer

 

That's not food miles...it's food inches!

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