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I live in the Southern US and have 5 medium/large hens (Welsummer, Australorp, Legbar etc), all in their first winter. They live in an Eglu Cube Mk2, with a 3m x 7m walk-in run attached.  The run has proved to be secure against our local predators; these are mainly raccoons, with their naughty little monkey-hands, that leave muddy prints all over the latches to the coop and run after a wet night! Local chicken forums report a very high rate of predation inside runs and coops, so I'm very impressed by Omlet's security!  As the run is secure I generally leave the coop door open at night.  When the weather gets "cold", though, I start to close it (and have ordered an automatic door to help with that), and when it gets "very cold" I add the Eglu thermal jacket over the coop.  At the moment, though, I'm guessing at what "cold" and "very cold" are and would love some opinions/advice on that.  I understand that chickens are pretty good at staying warm, but the roosting bars of the eglu are at the same level as the door so I imagine the cold air seeps in around the sleeping hens.  In winter here it can get cold at night (although my neighbors to the north will laugh at that) - perhaps down to  -12 deg C (+10 deg F).  It's not often wet, though, and there's not much wind.  I'm not sure if I'm keeping them comfortable or making them sleep in a sauna! Any thoughts?

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I will have to leave it to others to comment on the thermal jacket as I have no experience of it.  However, I can say that I have kept birds at -10 temps before with no ill effects although I did give in and provide them with a warm pellet mash in the morning and also in the late afternoon sometimes, together with a straight wheat scratch feed, to keep them going overnight.  TBH I am not sure why Omlet think such a thing as a thermal jacket is necessary, given how much they trumpet the insulation qualities of the twin walled construction of the housing, plus the fact the birds are fully feathered.  I guess I am trying to say that I'm sure they will not be too cold, but as to your question about whether they will be too hot/humid I can't answer from a position of knowledge, although I suspect they will be fine and I would carry on doing what you are doing!

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I know someone who had 3 Orpingtons, which are a very fluffy and well insulated breed. It was -12C and they decided it was too cold to go outside and shut the coop, so they left the pop-hole open all night. In the morning the went outside to find all three dead; frozen stiff. Then they had the audacity to ask us if we'd sell them some replacements. Needless to say the answer was a firm 'no'!

It will depend on the wind direction but I'd have the pop-hole shut below zero ensuring there is sufficient ventilation to get some air circulation.

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We don’t have temperatures like that where I am, but I close the door when temperatures go below 0, and last year when temperatures went to around -4 to -6 I blocked up the gaps at foot level with bubble wrap (left the vents at the top clear for ventilation). I haven’t got a thermal jacket because I’d probably only use it about  one night a year!

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It has got down to -12 here and my lot have been fine. I just shut the cube door.  I think the Mark 2 cubes may not have the same insulating qualities of the Mark1.  However, I do remember when I first had them, putting in the pet hot water bottles each night!  I think you worry less as you see how well insulated chickens themselves are! 

I find the main problem in really cold weather is keeping the water thawed.  Now I’m retired it’s not so bad that I have to keep going out with kettles of hot water, but it was a worry when I was working.   I rigged up empty sweet tins with air holes in and with night lights in and stood the water on that.  What a palaver! 

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I leave the cube doors open unless it falls below -6deg at night. I bring the water in at night in extremely cold weather and use Snugglesafe heat pads under the drinkers during the day. I don't block up any ventilation holes  and have clear tarps over the runs.

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