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AndyRoo

Hen with messy bum...

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Those rules in the UK always surprise me. My vet has prescribed me the iverquantel, and you can even buy it online without any prescription or anything.

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41 minutes ago, Cat tails said:

Those rules in the UK always surprise me. My vet has prescribed me the iverquantel, and you can even buy it online without any prescription or anything.

I got the impression from her that some of the treatments make the eggs dangerous to eat for a significant amount of time and it's therefore connected to contaminating food sources. I suppose the concern is that, if it were used in commercial farming, it would pose a danger to the public which is why it's not allowed.

I got the impression that the Ivermectin should only be used if the infection is completely out of control and/or other measures don't work.

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3 hours ago, AndyRoo said:

I got the impression that the Ivermectin should only be used if the infection is completely out of control and/or other measures don't work.

This isn't the case; the only reason that it isn't more widely used in poultry is because a) it isn't licenced in the UK an b) there aren't many specialist poultry vets around. Outside the UK it is widely used on backyard poultry.... and humans.... to treat endo- and ecto-parasites!

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20 minutes ago, The Dogmother said:

This isn't the case; the only reason that it isn't more widely used in poultry is because a) it isn't licenced in the UK an b) there aren't many specialist poultry vets around. Outside the UK it is widely used on backyard poultry.... and humans.... to treat endo- and ecto-parasites!

And other small pets including birds, rodents and reptiles. And kids. 😂

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9 hours ago, The Dogmother said:

This isn't the case; the only reason that it isn't more widely used in poultry is because a) it isn't licenced in the UK an b) there aren't many specialist poultry vets around. Outside the UK it is widely used on backyard poultry.... and humans.... to treat endo- and ecto-parasites!

She said she could prescribe Ivermectin for that use - just not anything else because it was illegal. But she said the best bet was to get them under control the other way as they wouldn't generally use a spot-on treatment for hens. I'm just parroting what she was saying. She was one of the exotic pet vets, and she kept hens herself, so I'm trusting her to tell me the right stuff.

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You may find that you can get it cheaper online Andy - check your prices before getting through the vet. There is one dog drug that I get regularly - it is FAR more expensive via the vet than it is to pay for a PX from the vet and then use that to buy it online.

If you use the spot-on regularly, then you will be on top of your mites, lice and worms. I just test the worm levels quarterly anyhow, and treat if necessary.

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I have some ivermectin drops for the Rabbit so thought I would dose the chooks as well after this thread. It is the 1% version - how many drops do you normally use for a standard sized hybrid and also for a Bantam as I would imagine a lower dose would be needed. William is a Pekin and he is quite a lot smaller than my girls.

Thanks!

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The general advice for chickens is 0.25ml per hybrid less for bantams. I don't think that you need to be massively scientific about it - I never am!

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3 hours ago, The Dogmother said:

You may find that you can get it cheaper online Andy - check your prices before getting through the vet. There is one dog drug that I get regularly - it is FAR more expensive via the vet than it is to pay for a PX from the vet and then use that to buy it online.

If you use the spot-on regularly, then you will be on top of your mites, lice and worms. I just test the worm levels quarterly anyhow, and treat if necessary.

I already found Ivermectin (1%) for Rabbits etc. online, so maybe I'll just buy some and see if that works.

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5 minutes ago, AndyRoo said:

I already found Ivermectin (1%) for Rabbits etc. online, so maybe I'll just buy some and see if that works.

Bear in mind that this isn't a one-off treatment; you need to do it regularly.

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10 hours ago, The Dogmother said:

Bear in mind that this isn't a one-off treatment; you need to do it regularly.

If it works, I'll keep doing it. If not, I'll keep seeing if the dusting method works.

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10 hours ago, AndyRoo said:

If it works, I'll keep doing it. If not, I'll keep seeing if the dusting method works.

:) I already know what the result will be - after a couple of days all the lice/mites will be gone. 

You need to check your birds regularly for any external parasites, and also do a faecal worm test, or worm them quarterly. Same as you'd do with your cats and dogs ;)

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2 hours ago, The Dogmother said:

:) I already know what the result will be - after a couple of days all the lice/mites will be gone. 

You need to check your birds regularly for any external parasites, and also do a faecal worm test, or worm them quarterly. Same as you'd do with your cats and dogs ;)

I worm them regularly. 

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So, Ivermectin Q. Of the ones I can find available online, my choices are the two below. Has anyone tried either? Are they even suitable? I've literally no idea what I'm looking for in a de-louser. 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/PHARMAQ-Ivermectin-Drops-5ml-Treatment/dp/B00JVPZV9K/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=ivermectin&qid=1588345726&sr=8-2

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/dp/B001UALNX2/ref=dp_cerb_1

Thanks,

Andy

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The beaphar only has 150 ug ivermectin per pipet. According to the dosing of Iverquantel you need 200 ug per kg of body weight. I think the other one is easier to dose.

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44 minutes ago, Cat tails said:

The beaphar only has 150 ug ivermectin per pipet. According to the dosing of Iverquantel you need 200 ug per kg of body weight. I think the other one is easier to dose.

Crickey! Based on the weight dosage, I think I might be able to treat 1 or maybe 2 hens per bottle, so that'd be between £140 - £250 to treat them all. :/ I certainly couldn't afford to do that every month for maintenance. 

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40 minutes ago, AndyRoo said:

Crickey! Based on the weight dosage, I think I might be able to treat 1 or maybe 2 hens per bottle, so that'd be between £140 - £250 to treat them all. :/ I certainly couldn't afford to do that every month for maintenance. 

This one offers more dosage info for the 1% solution.

https://www.chickenvet.co.uk/ivermectin-1-spot-on-drops-10ml

And is double the amount for the same price!

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So, we've just done a treatment of the flock (I hadn't appreciated that one dose wasn't a 1ml drop!). How often should we look to do this? Also, should I withdraw eggs for 7 days? I was a bit confused by this because some places say to withdraw, others say not to worry.

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Remember that ivermectin is a treatment given to humans in the Netherlands... I think it’s up to your own judgement. I never bother withdrawing, but that’s my own decision.

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8 minutes ago, Cat tails said:

Remember that ivermectin is a treatment given to humans in the Netherlands... I think it’s up to your own judgement. I never bother withdrawing, but that’s my own decision.

Fair enough. If I treat them with Flubenvet I tend to withdraw the eggs, but I guess that's just precautionary.

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On 5/6/2020 at 7:16 PM, Cat tails said:

Remember that ivermectin is a treatment given to humans in the Netherlands... I think it’s up to your own judgement. I never bother withdrawing, but that’s my own decision.

Me neither - I consider myself wormed and de-loused! Andy standard vet advice is to withdraw eggs from consumption for 7 days from treatment - whether or not you do this is up to you.

On 5/6/2020 at 7:31 PM, AndyRoo said:

Fair enough. If I treat them with Flubenvet I tend to withdraw the eggs, but I guess that's just precautionary.

You don't need to withdraw eggs if using Flubenvet.

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