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Surprised by the RSPCA

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Yesterday our temporary resident cat Harry caught a wood pigeon in the garden. I managed to chase the cat off and after a prolonged chase caught the pigeon which had lost every tail feather and most of it's flight feathers. Consequently, it could barely get off the ground - but it tried.

I got it into a box after checking that it did not appear to have any other injuries.

Mindful that stress is probably the greatest killer of birds subjected to such an attack and knowing nothing much about them I grabbed the phone directory to contact the RSPCA as quickly as possible. 3 phone books later I had still drawn a blank. The RSPCA don't appear to want to publish themselves even though I knew that they had a rescue place a few miles away in Salford.

To cut a long story short I spent 3/4hr contacting the animal welfare/rescue places that I could find but with little success. Eventually one of them gave me the RSPCA number, upon calling it I was informed the "Sorry we don't do birds." They gave me the number of a possible sanctuary however it was a defunct number. Finally another animal welfare organisation gave me a contact number for an individual who can handle wild birds. He took it away after a careful examination and was confident that in 3-4 weeks it would be flying again.

I realise that many people don't have much regard for wood pigeons but it was an eyeopener just to realise how little assistance there is for wild creatures in distress.

The biggest surprise was that the RSPCA is so limited in it's interests and so reclusive. They don't make that plain when seeking funds.

There was a light hearted aside. I contacted one bird sanctuary only to be informed that it was a Bird of Prey Centre and "our inmates eat wood pigeons!" Oops.

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They must have changed their policy. Years ago we had a magpie caught by a cat in our garden. It was alive but in a badly mangled state.

 

The RSPCA came and "euthanised" it (what a horrible made up word).

 

One of its wings had been torn off so there was no option.

 

Looks as if you will be hand feeding for a while! :roll::D

 

If it is anything like the wood pigeons in our garden, they love young seedlings! :roll:

 

Good luck.

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I think you'll find that the RSPCA 'don't do deer' either :? - unless there are TV cameras around of course :?

 

We had a collision with a deer on a country road - the deer was still breathing but badly hurt. It took me ages to get hold of a contact number - via the Police - and no-one wanted to know.

 

I had to watch the deer die as we waited for the AA to come - an hour and a half :(

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I have found many rescue places have a similar attitude, despite getting many mailings at home from a variety of them asking for funds, when I contact them about anything they are neither keen to help nor particularly friendly.Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there are some wonderful people out there doing their best with whatever means they have to make a difference to animals in need, but in my experience a lot of improvement is needed...

 

Birds caught by cats are in double danger though, as not only they sustain stress and injuries, but also it seems that cat saliva contains a bacteria called Pasteurella which is poisonous to birds. I once read that any bird that has been, even briefly, held in a cat's mouth, should be treated with antibiotics... not the easiest thing to do with a wild bird already traumatised by an attack!!

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RSPCA is a swearword in my house. I have no respect for them and never give them any money. They once told me on the phone to put a baby squirrel I found next to its dead mother in a sack and 'bash its filthy brains out against a wall'!!!!2.gif

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RSPCA is a swearword in my house. I have no respect for them and never give them any money. They once told me on the phone to put a baby squirrel I found next to its dead mother in a sack and 'bash its filthy brains out against a wall'!!!!2.gif

 

I dont have time for the rspca either as they put healthy animals to sleep rather than finding them homes. I wouldnt give them my money either :evil::evil:

 

Wood pigeons by the way are one of my favourite birds, I just adore the coo-ing they make and well done to you :clap: for trying your best to help out this bird. Hope it gets better soon :)

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Guest

I've also had bad experiences with the RSPCA and would never give them my money. I've heard numerous stories of people contacting them for help with injured or neglected animals and them not being willing to help.

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I have nothing good to say about the RSPCA either, and would not give them donations. Well done for being so persistant and finding someone to help, I hope the poor bird makes a full and swift recovery.

 

Chelsea, I agree with you, wood pigeons are just beautiful! I have quite a few who visit my garden and they are just so pretty, but always so wary.

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Chelsea, I agree with you, wood pigeons are just beautiful! I have quite a few who visit my garden and they are just so pretty, but always so wary.

 

Awww, bless. Yes they are gorgeous arent they? A bit dippy (they are always hanging around our house in pairs) but I could sit and listen to their coo-ing all day - so relaxing. Wood pigeons are way underestimated in my opinion!! :D

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Hear, hear!!! I totally agree with you all - this time last year we found a very poorly cat in our garden. I managed to catch it and put it in our cat box - it looked such a sorry mess. I eventually got the RSPCA's number via directory enquirys and after approximately 2 hours of phoning - and that's no word of a lie - and getting rung off I gave up and contacted my local animal rescue. No problem at all - they took the cat in and eventually sent her to a vets about 30 miles away because she needed specialist care - they thought she was in renal failure. She was treated there and eventually rehomed.

 

Because of that experience I would never support the RSPCA again - I give to my local rescue instead.

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Birds caught by cats are in double danger though, as not only they sustain stress and injuries, but also it seems that cat saliva contains a bacteria called Pasteurella which is poisonous to birds. I once read that any bird that has been, even briefly, held in a cat's mouth, should be treated with antibiotics... not the easiest thing to do with a wild bird already traumatised by an attack!!

The young guy who came and collected the bird examined it carefully and said that it would be given antibiotics for 5 days and he expected that it would be able to fly in around 3 weeks. Apparently all the flight feathers had been pulled out. Consequently they would grow back quickly whereas if they had been broken they don't grow until the bird moults.

I am happy that it is being well cared for. It's not that I am a particular fan of wood pigeons although close up their feathers are beautiful, but I couldn't just let it become prey to any passing moggy

Edited by Guest

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I have found many rescue places have a similar attitude, despite getting many mailings at home from a variety of them asking for funds, when I contact them about anything they are neither keen to help nor particularly friendly.Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there are some wonderful people out there doing their best with whatever means they have to make a difference to animals in need, but in my experience a lot of improvement is needed...

 

My daughter used to work voluntarily at a locally well thought of Animal Rescue Centre but after 2 years she gave up due to the bickering and dictatorial attitude of so many of it's "principals". They all acted as if they were God and the welfare of the animals hardly entered into their consideration. In desperation I tried them whilst casting around. They were no help. :cry:

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Well done for persevering and finding someone to care for it. I too love woodpigeons. A pair are regular visitors to our garden - they sit at the top of the climbing frame and gloat at the chickens :lol:

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Thats really a sorry state for what the public see as a charity that cares.....We once found an injured seagull (christmas day) the RSPCA in Hull was really good......This was quie a few years ago but I never realised how bad they where in some places.......Maybe this should be pointed out to their head office???

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Thats really a sorry state for what the public see as a charity that cares.....We once found an injured seagull (christmas day) the RSPCA in Hull was really good......This was quie a few years ago but I never realised how bad they where in some places.......Maybe this should be pointed out to their head office???

Sadly, I was aware that there have been concerns raised locally about the responses from the RSPCA.

Perhaps I shpould have tried for the RSPB, I did not think of it at the time, but I am not at all sure that they have a role like the RSPCA (used to have).

Certainly their reaction does not correspond with the impression they like to portray.

They have recently been criticised in the national press for giving the impression that they have powers of entry to houses without a warrant to protect animals .They do not even if they turn up with the police. They were also criticised for adopting police like uniforms to add to their 'presence'. Not an appealing situation.

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I'm not a big fan of pigeons, but I really think that if an animal is in need then what we see as the main animal rescue place in the uk (RSPCA) should really be doing what it says it is doing.

 

I get annoyed at people and places that "do for the cameras, but if you are a mere pleb, then shove off"

 

luckily I have never needed to contact somewhere like that for an animal (next doors cat doesnt just play, :evil: ) but I would expect a positive reaction.

 

maybe an email to head office would help :?

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I'm not a big fan of pigeons, but I really think that if an animal is in need then what we see as the main animal rescue place in the uk (RSPCA) should really be doing what it says it is doing.

 

I get annoyed at people and places that "do for the cameras, but if you are a mere pleb, then shove off"

 

luckily I have never needed to contact somewhere like that for an animal (next doors cat doesnt just play, :evil: ) but I would expect a positive reaction.

 

maybe an email to head office would help :?

I agree with you about pigeons, I think the feral ones are ghastly;I also agree about injured animals of any kind but the RSPCA appear to be so entrenched - I had dealings with them from time to time when I had a 'proper job' and I see no mileage in trying to get them change what is clearly a nationwide policy. The lack of a phone number in 3 local phone books speaks volumes "Don't upset us.."

In future I can't see myself helping their funding.

As you say in your signature "it ain't worth chewing the leather straps etc" :cry:

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I agree that the RSPCA are neither use nor ornament in the main, and often co-operate with agencies such as the police AGAINST the best interests of animals :evil: , as was the case in the recent raids on "animal rights extremists", some of whom were running shelters for stray and abandoned animals.

 

When I was at university (a scarily long time ago) I heard about some rabbits that were liberated from a vivisection lab, which were returned to the vivisectors by the RSPCA.

 

Hillside farm animal sanctuary (check out their website) do amazing work documenting factory farm abuses such as the recent Bernard Matthews workers using live turkeys as baseballs, but the RSPCA very rarely agree to prosecute.

 

HOWEVER, this February I was walking my dogs in the park first thing on a saturday morning and found a GNR which had been thrown over the wall in a carboard box. :( I managed to catch it and to keep my dogs from eating it (they thought I was bringing it home for them!). The RSPCA came out that afternoon to take it to a bird sanctuary.

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why do people do horrible things to animals?

 

if they dont want it, give it to someone who does!!

 

well done you for rescuing it :)

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I have no idea why people do it,like you say, dont dont people just give them away to someone who does want them.....

 

I have just checked our white pages and they have a bigish advert for the national number and 2 numbers for the local office......The Hull RSPCA must still having a caring and helping side to them......

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I have mixed opinions. My local one for little animals (about 45 miles away!) are fantastic, but I believe they are a subsiduary and get no funding from the main group. They were brilliant when I contacted them stating I was looking to home some GPs (as in take them in, not give them away). Ok, so I did come home with more than planned but that is more me being a soft touch than them forcing them on me. The more local dedicated rescue centre (non RSPCA) has never bothered to respond to my email or telephone message - some 6 weeks on. I guess that would explain why they are always 'full' ....

 

I guess it is the same with everything - it depends on the people involved.

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i once phoned the RSPCA because i was a park with a huge pond and there was a duck with fishing wire wrapped around her foot with the hook going through :vom: so i phoned up and they said "sorry we cant do birds but iam sure she'll sort it out by her self" in the end i couldnt just walk away so i went and got the park ranger and he looked after her.

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I guess it is the same with everything - it depends on the people involved.

I think you are right, it's individuals/local offices who have a caring or less caring attitude but not to have an advert in the White or Yellow pages or in Thomson Directory is more than a 'local'decision I would say. Perhaps city locations are less manageable.

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i once phoned the RSPCA because i was a park with a huge pond and there was a duck with fishing wire wrapped around her foot with the hook going through :vom: so i phoned up and they said "sorry we cant do birds but iam sure she'll sort it out by her self" in the end i couldnt just walk away so i went and got the park ranger and he looked after her.

Reminds me of an occasion when I was fishing in the Menai Straits with my son. We saw a cormorant in exactly the same plight. I managed to hook it and as we cut the line away I got bitten for my trouble! :shock: but it was nice to see it fluff it's feathers up and swim away.

It was the only thing I caught all day. I am a v kind fisherman (was) I never caught much! :?

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