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FlyingRamses

Grim Subject!! Disposal of dead chickens.

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Hi

 

Bit of a miserable topic but does anyone have any tips on disposal of chickens after they have died. I buried one of my hens, Marge (full ceremony of course!!) in about 2 feet of heavy clay type soil two months ago. We had the harrowing experience of a fox digging her up at the weekend and proceeding to run around the garden with her, bits falling off everywhere and feathers galore . . . . not good, especially as pet dog wanted to join in the 'fun'!! Had to bag her up and dispose of her with the household waste, smell was just horrendous.

 

Is it better to just take them to the local vet for disposal or is there something I can use to repel foxes from the burial area?

 

Sorry for the rather grim question!!

 

Thanks

 

FR :(

Edited by Guest

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I'm afraid my girls are put out with the household rubbish :( . I really don't like it but I have nowhere I can bury them. One had to go to the vets recently to be pts and I must admit it felt better knowing she was being cremated :( .

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We have ours cremated, the pet cemetery collect from the vets, they offer group and individual cremations, ashes scattered at the cemetary, ashes in a casket or ashes in a plastic tub for scattering. We have an individual cremation for our girls and have the ashes back for scattering. It does work out quite pricey though (just over £20 per hen), it's just what suits us.

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Bag and bin here too. It's practical. If you are going to bury a pet then you need a depth of 4' - too difficult in my heavy clay soil, I've done it for a cat but I couldn't do it every time I lost a hen. The vet will dispose of it if you ask, and if you just go for general cremation (no return of ashes) it's fairly cheap.

 

My bin is only emptied every other week, so if I lost a hen in the summer I'd take her to the vet for disposal.

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Bag and Bin.

 

Once we're gone. we're gone; the body is just a carcass once the light has gone from the eyes. Wish I could do it with me once I'm gone!

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In the process of working my way through the whole of the Omlet site, there was an article on dead chickens;

 

Cremation

Bag/bin

 

Environmental Heath don't want you burying it

 

I think it's in the 'GUIDE' tab

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I bag and bin my girlies too, except two that have been pts and they have both been cremated. It may not be the most pleasant subject, but we all need a plan for "what happens when ...".

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Pet cremation via the vets. You are given a little posie of dried flowers and a certificate. (£19.20) If you want the hens ashes it costs £70 :!:

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Pet cremation via the vets. You are given a little posie of dried flowers and a certificate. (£19.20) If you want the hens ashes it costs £70 :!:

 

:shock: Good Grief, I don't think we paid much more than £70 to have our Great Dane cremated and ashes in a casket (mind you, that was 14 years or so ago). Ours is something like £22 for ashes for scattering for a hen.

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It depends with me, i had Cheryl the turkey cremated at the vets, because she was so huge. Normally double bag, never ever buried as i don't want to have the experience of foxes re digging. :(

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We buried our first one, and then realised, we have 7 chickens, we won't be able to dig anywhere in our garden for fear of digging them up if we had lept the burying policy!

We now do the double bag, bin. Unfortunately both the hens we have lost and disposed of this way decided to die the day after the bins were taken, we are also on a 2 week collection!

 

Rachel

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Thankfully we have only lost 2 hens so far. One was cremated by vets and we attempted to cremate the other - not very well as it turned out. :|

 

However, we have a veritable ferret graveyard going on. Thankfully I paid attention to my dads methods during my childhood: make mental notes of where you buried the last one or use a marker, choose places where you won't dig later - eg under a lawn, and put a heavy weight (we have a special paving slab) over to prevent fox.

 

P

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When we lost our first hen we were worried about the local fox 'visiting' so my husband asked about cremation at our vets...,the price was just over £100 We brought her home and buried her.On the top we put a nice sandstone paver...thankfully we have been lucky and the fox hasn't bothered..I bury all my hens this way which seems to be working :pray: At this rate instead of the odd 'stepping stone' we'll end up with a fully paved garden.

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Double bag and donate money saved to hen charity is my suggestion. Give them a great life and accept when they go that's probably it.

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When we lost our first hen we were worried about the local fox 'visiting' so my husband asked about cremation at our vets...,the price was just over £100

 

£100 :shock::shock::shock:! My vet charged just over £17 and that included putting my girlie to sleep first. Think I'd be looking to change vet.

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My job involves visiting landfill sites, and I just don't like the thought of one of my hens being dumped in with all the stinky rubbish - they will still be ripped to bits by foxes and birds, just not outside your kitchen window! I do understand the bag and bin theory, and if I could get the landfill site image out of my head, I would probably do the same.

 

I wouldn't pay a fortune for cremation either, £100 is extortion :shock: It cost me £10 for consultation, put to sleep and disposal, so I think I'll stick to the vet I've got :D

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Thanks for all the advice, sounds like bin bags are the way but I will struggle with a couple of the girls who love it when I come into the garden and sit on my shoulders like parrots and half fall asleep as I chat or whistle to them . . . am I getting to close to my chickens, hahah?? I could not bag them up!!

 

Burial is definitely not happening again, especially in my rock hard clay/soil, will check cost of disposal with my vet I think as a second option after bin bags!!

 

Thanks for that link Witzend.

 

FR :?

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I have a friend who is a farmer and one of the first things she said to me when I told her I was getting chickens was when they die I could take them to the farm and feed them to the farm (wildish) cats :o not entirely sure how I feel about that now I've got them, but circle of life I guess :?

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Very sad to report one of my first hens, Daisy died today, she was 4 years old so had a good innings, she has been slowing down last few days and quietly left us this afternoon.

 

Could not face bagging her up so buried her and we planted a prickly plant over the top of her to hopefully discourage foxes.

 

Will really miss this friendly and chilled out bundle of showy white feathers strolling around the garden!!

 

FR :(

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